Gartner’s End User Predictions from 2010

This is what Gartner predicted for end users in 2010. What do you think now?

  1. By 2012, 20% of businesses will own no IT assets.
  2. By 2012, India-centric IT service companies will represent 20% of the leading cloud aggregators in the market.
  3. By 2012, Facebook will become the hub for social networks integration and Web socialization.
  4. By 2014, most IT business cases will include carbon remediation costs.
  5. In 2012, 60% of a new PC’s total life greenhouse gas emissions will have occurred before the user first turns the machine on.
  6. Internet marketing will be regulated by 2015, controlling more than $250 billion in Internet marketing spending worldwide.
  7. By 2014, more than three billion of the world’s adult population will be able to transact electronically via mobile and Internet technology.
  8. By 2015, context will be as influential to mobile consumer services and relationships as search engines are to the Web.
  9. By 2013, mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web accessdevice worldwide.

Review of the Gartner ERP Magic Quadrant

magic-quadrantIt’s been six years since I posted my views on the Gartner ERP magic quadrant for Tier 2 vendors. It has been one of the most viewed posts on my blog, but I think it’s now time to have a relook at the ERP magic quadrant (MQ) and the ERP market as a whole. Continue reading

Taking the steam out of STEM

Taking the steam out of STEM

stemFor the last few years, there have been many calls and articles about the importance of STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics. I’ve seen the acronym used most often in US-based communications, but it’s seen as an issue in other countries as well; for example, in South Africa we tend to talk about “Maths and Science”. The STEM proponents say the growing these skills is the only way we will be able to ensure employment in a world that is becoming more automated and smarter. But I am now hearing a different view, that there is more to work and life than maths and science skills. Continue reading

Bimodal IT doesn’t mean complexity

bimodal_itFor over a year the Gartner analyst group has been talking about the need for ‘bimodal IT’. An article in InformationWeek described it as the need for an IT organization to

split its focus between the core services that make other things possible and the more exciting possibilities of digital innovation.

When I first heard of bimodal IT I was still working in the ERP software space. Coming from that traditional background I used to think that any bimodal IT effort had to be somewhat big and complex. But now I’m at a cloud software company I’m beginning to see things differently. Continue reading

Why monolithic systems of record will disappear

cloud-computingI thought that having left the ERP industry I would not have any reason or inspiration to write about it, but I was wrong. My experiences since I started working in the cloud application market have led me to believe that the era of the monolithic systems of record, as typified by ERP, might be coming to an end. Continue reading

Why I have really joined the smartphone crowd

iphone4A few years ago I wrote about my experience of changing to a Nokia (now Microsoft) Windows Phone. I was a fan of the Nokia hardware design, and was working at an ERP software company that had a partnership with Microsoft, and I didn’t want to be like the crowd (i.e. iPhone or Android), so it seemed a reasonable decision to go the Windows Phone route. I also referred to reports about smartphone market share that I thought were biased – see here.

The truth is that now I have joined the crowd, the iPhone crowd. Continue reading

Why cloud computing will grow

cloud computingAn article in the Economist in 2014 noted that the expenditure on cloud applications was small compared to the huge amount business spent on IT as a whole. However, it pointed out that corporate reluctance to cloud computing was starting to be overcome. Continue reading