Why cloud computing will grow

cloud computingAn article in the Economist in 2014 noted that the expenditure on cloud applications was small compared to the huge amount business spent on IT as a whole. However, it pointed out that corporate reluctance to cloud computing was starting to be overcome.

Since April when I started my new role at Flowgear, I have become increasingly aware how strong, convincing and valuable it can be for business to embrace the cloud rather than resist it. I also attended the Gartner Application Architecture, Development and Integration Summit in London to help promote Flowgear, and heard senior Gartner analyst Andy Kyte speak on how old applications, i.e., on-premise systems, are being relegated, and even decommissioned, in favour of newer applications, which are increasingly cloud-based. His comment to me about the rate at which cloud computing was replacing some major on-premise systems was startling.

A major reason in my case for my previous ignorance and dismissal of cloud computing came from my work and background. As a baby boomer working in the ERP industry, my whole work experience was around on-premise applications, and I now realise that it was very difficult to see outside that envelope. I think it is also the perspective of many IT people of similar age and experience, and it may mean therefore that until the next generation become the decision makers, cloud computing won’t really take off. This may apply more in large businesses – in smaller ones and start-ups the Generation Xers and Millennials are already in charge.

Two recent articles on the ZDNet site have covered the topic of innovation and why cloud computing will grow. One article discussed how the enterprise technology incumbents were not seen as enabling innovation, and published survey results that showed cloud computing was the main platform for innovation.

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The other article reviewed the drivers that would make businesses move to the cloud. It will boil down to competing in a new world of business. This will mean that companies will be running:

mostly off-the-shelf enterprise software with a handful of custom-developed applications, probably containing core IP.

It’s going to take some time, but:

Enterprises will make increasing use of platform as a service, enabling developers to create web and mobile apps for any platform that integrates easily with software as a service and on-premises applications. Cloud technologies will be pervasive, with all corporate data managed using a cloud-based business model, underpinned by a hybrid cloud infrastructure.

I am now starting to wonder – I got my first experience of the enterprise software industry in the late 1990s, when ERP was beginning to come of age; within five years it was booming. I am now doing a similar thing with enterprise cloud computing; where that will be in 2020?

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